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Resident Alien WORK



After crash-landing on Earth, an alien sent to wipe out humanity kills and takes on the identity of a vacationing pathology physician. He is asked to do an autopsy on the town's doctor, who has died in unknown circumstances. He wrestles with the moral dilemma of his secret mission, while also dealing with the mayor's young son, who can see his true appearance.[8]




Resident Alien



If you are a resident alien, the rules for filing income, estate, and gift tax returns and paying estimated tax are generally the same whether you are in the United States or abroad. Your worldwide income is subject to U.S. income tax the same way as a U.S. citizen. You are a resident alien of the United States for tax purposes if you meet either the green card test or the substantial presence test for the calendar year.


In some cases, aliens can choose to be treated as U.S. resident aliens. For example, if, at the end of the tax year, you are a resident alien and your spouse is a nonresident alien, the two of you can choose to treat the nonresident alien spouse as a U.S. resident alien and file Form 1040 using the filing status married filing jointly.


If you are a U.S. resident alien, you use the same forms and mailing addresses as U.S. citizens. You can use the same filing statuses available to U.S. citizens. You can claim the same deductions allowed to U.S. citizens if you are a resident alien for the entire tax year.


You're considered to have met the green card test, and are therefore a resident alien, if at any time during the calendar year you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States according to the immigration laws, and this status hasn't been revoked or administratively or judicially determined to have been abandoned.


Even if you meet the substantial presence test, you may still be treated as a nonresident alien if you're present in the United States for fewer than 183 days during the current calendar year, you maintain a tax home in a foreign country during the year, you have a closer connection to that country than to the United States, and you timely file a Form 8840, Closer Connection Exception Statement for Aliens claiming you have a closer connection to a foreign country or countries. You can't claim a closer connection to a foreign country if you've applied, or took other steps during the year, to change your status to that of a lawful permanent resident of the United States, or you have an application pending for lawful permanent resident status (green card). Sometimes, a tax treaty between the United States and another country will provide special rules for determining residency for purposes of the treaty. If you claim to be solely a resident of a tax treaty jurisdiction, file Form 8833, Treaty-Based Return Position Disclosure Under Section 6114 or 7701(b). See Publication 519, U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens for more information about the substantial presence test.


Even if you don't meet the green card test or substantial presence test for the current year (for example, 2022), or the prior year (2021), and you did not choose to be treated as a U.S. resident for part of the prior year (2021), but you meet the substantial presence test in the following year (2023), you can choose to be treated as a U.S. resident alien for part of the current year (2022) and be taxed as a dual-status alien for the current year (2022) by making the First-Year Election or, if you are a nonresident alien married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien, and you and your spouse make an election for you to be treated as a resident alien for the entire calendar year and all subsequent years until terminated. See Chapter 1 of Publication 519, U.S. Tax Guide for AliensPDF for more information.


If your status changes during the year from resident alien to nonresident alien or vice versa, you generally have a dual-status tax year. This usually happens in the year when you arrive in or depart from the United States. Your tax on the income for the two periods will differ under the provisions of the laws that apply to each period. See Publication 519, U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens for more information about dual-status aliens.


If you're a nonresident alien who is engaged in a trade or business in the United States, you must file a return and report all of your income from U.S. sources, both from the trade or business and any U.S. source non-effectively connected income for which amounts have been withheld. If you're not engaged in a U.S. trade or business and have any U.S. source income on which the amount of tax withheld didn't fully satisfy the tax due, or you seek to claim a refund of overwithheld or overpaid tax, you must also file a Form 1040-NR. See the Instructions for Form 1040-NRPDF for more information.


Resident aliens must follow the same tax laws as U.S. citizens. If you're a resident alien, you must report your worldwide income from all sources, that is, income from both within and outside the United States. You'll file a Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return or Form 1040-SR, U.S. Tax Return for Seniors.


If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, the rules for filing income, estate, and gift tax returns and paying estimated tax are generally the same whether you are in the United States or abroad. You are subject to tax on worldwide income from all sources and must report all taxable income and pay taxes according to the Internal Revenue Code.


If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien residing overseas, or are in the military on duty outside the U.S., on the regular due date of your return, you are allowed an automatic 2-month extension to file your return without requesting an extension. For a calendar year return, the automatic 2-month extension is to June 15. For calendar year 2021 you must pay any tax due by April 18, 2022, or interest will be charged.


I'll give Harry a break since he's an alien and still learning, but with the female empowerment flowing around, it was awful that he suckered Carlyn into, uh, just being into him, I guess, so he could use her body to get a device he needed to phone home.


Revisiting the school and alien hotspot got everyone thinking about Liv and how little she's paid. That's been a running theme, and there's nothing like a bunch of drunk and sassy women empowering each other to light a spark where it's needed most.


Prior to the initial pilot order, Dark Horse tried to market the franchise as either a television series or movie from its beginning in 2011. The series was then in development hell for years, author Peter Hogan having had conversations with various parties on-and-off for years.[6] On May 31, 2018, Syfy ordered a pilot episode.[7] Production began on October 1, 2018, with Alan Tudyk starring as Harry.[8] It was ordered to series in February 2019, with production to begin in summer 2019.[9] Mayor Ben Hawthorne actor Levi Fiehler stated that the length of the show's development due to the delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic meant that the cast came to bond in a way rarely seen with any other series.[10] Regarding the show's content, showrunner Chris Sheridan stated "I tried to have two different storylines going through the show. One is the alien story of Harry coming down and wanting to kill everybody with his device. The other one is the town story. [I asked] 'What would the show be if the alien never showed up?' In the town story, I wanted that to be compelling enough and filled with enough three-dimensional characters that it takes a lot of the pressure off the sci-fi element and alien element."[11] Chris Sheridan initially pitched the series for the USA Network, however, USA is ultimately under the same banner of NBC Universal that Syfy is.[12]


As of March 15, 2021, Resident Alien holds a rating of 93% fresh on the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, with 29 reviews, 27 of them fresh. The site's Critics Consensus feature states that "Resident Alien takes a minute to settle into its skin, but once it does it finds fresh humor in a familiar framework and proves a perfect showcase for Alan Tudyk's singular comedic skills."[16] Ratings for the series have been said to be on a modest scale, but enough to gladden representatives at NBCUniversal. Jeff Bader, an NBCUniversal executive stated that "We launch shows all the time and we want to pretend that every show can be the next big hit. But it's actually rare that you have a show that people seem to respond to ... and this is one of those shows."[17] Syfy revealed that the show's pilot episode saw a total of over 9 million viewers across all platforms, with the second episode seeing an uptick of 581,000 audience members, the greatest for a cable drama launch since 2014. Lisa Katz, president of Syfy's scripted content, stated that "With Resident Alien, everything just came together in perfect harmony" and that "The appeal of this show transcended the sci-fi genre in a way that enabled us to bring in a broader audience..."[18] The series has been described as a "hit original show" for Syfy, something somewhat unusual for a cable network in a period in which audiences have largely turned towards streaming media services and is considered "vindication of the network's effort to get further into original programming." It has also been life-changing for its lead actor, Alan Tudyk, who was previously known for supporting roles.[19]


An alien is any individual who is not a U.S. citizen or U.S. national. The taxation of aliens by the United States is significantly affected by the residency status of such aliens. Although the immigration laws of the United States refer to aliens as immigrants, nonimmigrants, and undocumented (illegal) aliens, the tax laws of the United States refer only to Nonresident Alien (NRA) and Resident Alien (RA).


A Resident Alien for tax purposes is treated in the same manner as a U.S. citizen when filing a tax return and paying taxes. A Nonresident Alien for tax purposes has a completely different method of having tax withheld, completing tax forms and tax documents, and is eligible for very few and limited deductions when paying taxes. A Resident Alien for tax purposes must report worldwide income, whereas, a Nonresident Alien for tax purposes must only report and pay tax on money that he or she receives from U.S. sources. 041b061a72


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